Other Projects

Books:

Amy Bentley, Eating for Victory: Food Rationing and the Politics of Domesticity (University of Illinois Press, 1998).

EFV

Amy Bentley, Editor, A Cultural History of Food in the Modern Age (Berg, 2012).

photo

Curricula:

sustainable-consumption.png

Cookbook Foreward:

Around the World in 80 Purees: Easy Recipes for Global Baby Food, by Leena Saini (Quirk Books, 2016).

Saini cover

Projects:

The NYU Urban Farm Lab

The Experimental Cuisine Collective (ECC)

Editor, Food, Culture, and Society: An International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research

rffc20.v019.i02.cover.jpg

Selected journal articles, essays, and book chapters:

  • Bentley, Amy. “What Should Babies Eat and Whose Business is it? In Matthew Booker and Chad Ludington, Eds. Food Fights: How the Past Matters in Contemporary Food Debates (University of North Carolina Press, forthcoming).
  • Bentley, Amy. Ketchup as a Vegetable: Condiments, Culture and the Politics of School Lunch in Reagan’s America. In Deirdre Murphy, Beth Forrest, and Andrew Donnelly, Eds. Sauces and Identity in the Western World,(Oxford University Press, forthcoming).
  • Bentley, Amy. “How Ketchup Revolutionized How Food is Grown, Processed, and Regulated” June 4, 2018. Smithsonian.com.
  • Bentley, Amy. “Is Ketchup the Perfect Complement to the American Diet?” June 4, 2018. Zocalo.com.
  • Bentley, Amy and Shayne Leslie Figueroa. “A History of Food in Popular Culture Over the Life Span,” in Peter Naccarato and Kathleen LeBesco, Eds. The Bloomsbury Handbook of Food and Popular Culture (Bloomsbury, 2017): 83-95.
  • Albala, Ken, Warren Belasco, Amy Bentley, Lisa Heldke, and Alex McIntosh. FCS Editors’ Roundtable: Reflections on the Twentieth Anniversary of the Journal.” Food, Culture and Society 20:1(March 2017): 1-14.
  • Bentley, Amy.  “Growing Concerns.”  The Times Literary Supplement (March 23, 2016).
  • Bentley, Amy and Hi’ilei Hobart.  “Food in Recent U.S. History.” In Food in Time and Place: The American Historical Association Companion to Food History, eds. Paul Freedman, Joyce E. Chaplin, and Ken Albala (University of California Press, 2014): 165-187.
  • Bentley, Amy. “Sustenance, Abundance, and the Place of Food in United States Histories.” In Global Food Historiography: Researchers, Writers, & the Study of Food, eds. Kyri Claflin and Peter Scholliers (Berg, 2012): 72-86.
  • Bentley, Amy. “The Frontiers of Food Studies,” with Belasco et al. Food, Culture and Society, Vol, 14, No. 3, (September, 2011): 301-314.
  • Bentley, Amy. “Eating in Class: Gastronomy, Taste, Nutrition, and Teaching Food History,” with Bender at al. Radical History Review, 110 (Spring 2011): 197-216.
  • Bentley, Amy. “Historians and the Study of Material Culture,” with Auslander, et al. American Historical Review, 114(December 2009): 1355-1404.
  • Bentley, Amy. “Introduction” and Guest Editor, “Sweetness and Power: Rethinking Sidney Mintz’s Classic Work.” Food and Foodways, Vol. 16, No. 2(2008).
  • Bentley, Amy. “The Politics on Our Plates.” The Chronicle Review (Chronicle of Higher Education), Volume LIII, No. 8(October 18 2006): B13-B15.
  • Bentley, Amy. “Booming Baby Food: Infant Food and Feeding in Post-World War II America.” Michigan Historical Review 32, 2(Fall 2006): 63-88.
  • Bentley, Amy. “Men on Atkins: Dieting, Meat, and Masculinity.” In The Atkins Diet and Philosophy, eds. Lisa Heldke, et al, (Chicago and La Salle, IL: Open Court Press, 2005): 185-195.
  • Bentley, Amy. “The Other Atkins Revolution: Atkins and the Shifting Culture of Dieting.” Gastronomica 4, 3(August 2004): 34-45.
  • Bentley, Amy. “From Culinary Other to Mainstream American: Meanings and Uses of Southwestern Cuisine.” In Culinary Tourism: Explorations in Eating and Otherness, ed., Lucy M. Long (University of Kentucky Press, 2004): 209-225.
  • Bentley, Amy. “Islands of Serenity: The Icon of the Ordered Meal in World War II.” In Food and Culture in the United States: A Reader, ed., Carol Counihan (Routledge, 2002):171-192.
  • Bentley, Amy. “Reading Food Riots: Scarcity, Abundance, and National Identity.” In Food, Drink and Identities, ed., Peter Scholliers (Oxford and New York: Berg, 2001): 179-183.

For more information please click here.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s